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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Thank you for the welcome especially my Aussie compatriots.
Since I bought the tornado 1130 two months ago it has remained off the road as I replaced fluids and checked it had the updated parts and renewed some others.
I have gained a lot of information from the forum and hope to contribute.
This is how I tackled the coolant problem.
Firstly I drilled and tapped the thermostat lid to 1/8 B.S.P. There is a take-off blank on it which is perfect for this. To this I added a male/female err....I’m guessing non- binary, intersex stainless steel ball valve ( I try to be inclusive) . This has resistance to failure from temperature, pressure, gas and fluid ( like acid).
Threaded into this a 1/8 B.S.P. Barb with 5/16 tail. Add clear tube leading down to a bucket.
On the other side of the bike I cut the hose leading into the expansion chamber and added a 5/16 joining piece, to this more tubing going down to the bucket.
The radiator top needed to be stoppered but also allowing fluid flow to radiator and other parts.
At the bucket end a small but powerful 12v pump (old aquarium pump) was attached to the hose. I removed the drainage plug from the cylinder front and hooked the pump up to a battery. When coolant came out of the plug at the front cylinder it threaded the plug back in.fluid and a lot of air was flowing back into the bucket, in fact to much air. I found the pump was sucking some air. I clamped down the hoses.
Started squeezing hoses and was rewarded with streams of air bubbles, I then reversed the flow and squeezed hoses again till no air bubbles were seen. Stopped the pump and shut the valve. Disconnected hoses. The next day I twice drained the fluid from the valve and pumped fluid through the valve side , the first time to see what would happen and the second to take a few more pictures.
Squeezing the hoses each time . It did seem like bleeding brakes, the hoses getting harder to squeeze.
The next day I took her round the bock a few times with constant check of temperature gauge and everything seemed normal considering my very limited knowledge of the bike. I spent a while going slowly looking for some kind of heat spike but temp. hung around the half way mark or just above, I then stopped for a bit till the fans came on , rode home and temperature was back to normal.
That night after the motor cooled removed the radiator cap and added about a tablespoon of coolant.l will now try to upload some photos, if that doesn’t work will try in the morning when I am a bit more sober.
36834
 

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Proving once again that there's more than one way to skin a cat.

If you can get access to both sides of the thermostat, bleeding becomes a simple exercise.
Benelli did add a bleeding hose on the upstream side, back to the top of the radiator, but routed the hose with a dip in it, creating an airlock! I'll be restoring a Tornado shortly, replacing perished hoses amongst many other things. One thing I'm going to try is re-routing that bleed hose to remove the airlock. I have high expectations that it will work much better. The upstream side of the thermostat is a lot more difficult to deal with as there is no access. You need to add a plate with a nipple to make that happen, or rely on the thermostat bleed hole to pass the trapped air, and being only 1 mm dia, that takes a while.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Proving once again that there's more than one way to skin a cat.

If you can get access to both sides of the thermostat, bleeding becomes a simple exercise.
Benelli did add a bleeding hose on the upstream side, back to the top of the radiator, but routed the hose with a dip in it, creating an airlock! I'll be restoring a Tornado shortly, replacing perished hoses amongst many other things. One thing I'm going to try is re-routing that bleed hose to remove the airlock. I have high expectations that it will work much better. The upstream side of the thermostat is a lot more difficult to deal with as there is no access. You need to add a plate with a nipple to make that happen, or rely on the thermostat bleed hole to pass the trapped air, and being on
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited by Moderator)
Ok I have not wrote this very well. Let me state that I theorised by squeezing the hoses and the coolant passing by the thermostat air is forced out and sucked out air from the engine side. This is what happened. A few squeezes was all it took. I see no evidence of air in the system.
This is a quick easy way to purge air from the motorcycle.
Cheap pump from eBay pictured.
36838
 
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