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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
IS this actually the case, I've seen it mentioned in the press but the factory tech specs on brochure's and the factory web site says its Wet, usually any pics Ive seen either TnT or Tornado has a dry clutch visible, ie, a half clutch cover or something, the Esse was meant to have one so too the TnT Titanium, (Dry slipper), the 1130cc Tornado clutch cover looks exactly like the 900's?!
 

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Dry clutches

:p

Red Dog told me that as far as they know the 1130 will have a dry clutch as standard.:clap:
It is a shame that they didn't fit carbon fibre front and rear mudguards as standard, the plastic one's let the bike down a bit.:(
 

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dry clutch

Yes dry clutch gives slight more power to back wheel,does not contaminate the engine oil and makes a nice rattle that makes every one look ! ,but it wears out quicker so is it really best for a road bike ? Mind you I would have the dry one just for that special rattle!!!
 

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Well I have the dry clutch and can tell you everybody around hates me, they always look to see where is that helicopter making all that noise:rolling:

It was said it has the anti hopping but I get the rear wheel blocking while changing down fast. Never happened on the standard version.

Slipping is nicer on the standard too, smoother I would say. Otherwise transfer of power is immediate and more brutal on the dry clutch. Softens with the time.
 

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To fit a dry clutch to a wet clutch equipped bike would be possible. But you may well need to change the inner engine case(s) to do it. It would of course require an entire clutch R&R as I doubt they are the same.

Remember that the engine case(s) on a wet clutch are designed to let oil in to and out of the clutch area. A bike equipped with a dry clutch is designed to not let oil into the clutch area.

I looked into converting a Suzuki TLR engine assy (from one of my Bimota SB8RS bikes) from the standard wet clutch to a dry clutch. It became a very expensive project. I decided to get some custom made billet aluminum engine outter cases made with lexan clear windows in the outer cases to expose the engine internals....looks very trick.

The way to research this conversion would be to get a service and/or parts manual for both your wet clutched bike and the donor dry clutch model you will be getting parts from and compare all the associated engine parts and part numbers. That will give you a fairly good starting point. Then I would suggest you talk with a Benelli shop that has worked in the engines of both wet and dry clutched bikes to see what they think is possible.

It may just be better to find a Benelli engine assy with the dry clutch and consider an engine swap instead.

Let us know what you come up with.

If you are looking for more power and less drag from your wet clutch, try a very thin viscosity full synthetic motor oil like the race teams use. This will get you some performance gains, but may require more frequent maintenance and/or decrease overall engine reliability and/or longivity.

Why do you want the dry clutch? They may be other alternatives that will meet your desired goal without a major engine mod.

:)

:bow:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
STM Wetty

STM do a wet slipper clutch for the 900 Tre and RS, I would imagine it weighs a lot less than the factory item and may transit more power?

or wait to someone totals a 1130cc bike and snaffle the engine for your 900, the frame is very similiar if not exactly the same, I think only the swingarm is very slithly thicker for the 1130
 

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First of all I dont believe every thing I read, But I remember reading somewhere that to handle the extra power of the 1130 engine that the frame and swingarm were built with increased thickness to improve both strength and stiffness.

I dont know if this is a true statement or just a rumor however.

:)

If an aftermarket clutch is lighter in weight that the standard clutch you will of course get improved throttle response as well as the engine will spool up faster. You may loose a bit of low rpm smoothness as a heavy clutch assists the continued rotation of the engine at lower rpm(s). You may find the bike easier to stall at low rpm with a lighter clutch. But I like the idea of both a lighter moving engine component and of course the slipper function can be of assist, although on a triple or 4 cylinder bike it is not needed nearly as much as on a big twin or big thumper.

:rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
stm & Frame

I think the frame is the same, and the swingarm is (wait for it) 0.1mm thicker :)

I was gonna go a STM if i get the Sport.
 
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