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hi everybody
iam thinking of getting a tnt cafe racer anyone any thoughts on the reliable and whats the ride like
cheers seanh
 

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Go for it! Theres a guy selling one on here - RichardDM... hes loaded so make him a silly offer and he will probably accept :rolling: :rolling:
 

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Don't Believe The Hype!!!

Fraught with issues. Build quality is substandard. Even though you pay top $$$ the CR will, at some stage, leave you stranded. I suspect this to be across the Benelli range.
 

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as do all other marques and i have some of the best and they all fail at sometime .
why are people full of such negs

the japs arnt that good
 

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Not negative: Frustrated

.......because, although they pay $24,000, they have to push the bike 6km after a catastrophic failure. Then they wait 3 months to have it repaired. Then they have to pay thousands of dollars to repair what should be under warranty. Then they are informed that the mechanics of the bike are substandard. Then they discover that the clutch will be next.
 

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Nute, I suspect that some of the original owners of Honda's VF750 felt the same way. It took a couple of years before Honda (kind of) admitted they had cocked up the design, and started repairing them.

Honda Australia still doesn't know about the special tool required to adjust the valve tappet clearances properly :rolling:

I don't know of ONE instance of Honda replacing a complete engine, whereas, Benelli have done this several times - which speaks volumes for their customer service.
 

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Australia seems to have the most problems with their TNT's.

Yeah and besides crashing mine I have not had problems with mine and it has 9500miles on it. I did have a problem with my Rizoma twist throttle slipping on the tube -not Benelli's fault though and some super glue fixed that on the road.
I have such fun riding my CR. I look forward to it every weekend. And it still draws onlookers.

Paul
 

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hi everybody
iam thinking of getting a tnt cafe racer anyone any thoughts on the reliable and whats the ride like
cheers seanh
What's the ride like - well in short, fun!

It looks different but cool, it has a very nice riding position even for riders taller than a japanese jockey, it's simply fun in town and on the twisties, and it sounds awesome. It is indeed a great modern cafe racer. Thanks to the more forward-leaning riding position, it's pretty comfortable when doing the ton, even though it's not an ideal touring bike.

The bar end mirrors take some getting used to, but you can actually see behind you from them. A slightly bigger downside may be the fuel consumption, as it's likely to be rather thirsty. Partly because you won't be able to resist the urge to have a bit of fun with it. So whilst you may get less miles with a litre or a gallon, at least those miles will be quite enjoyable ones.

As for the reliability, well, I think it's better in general than many people suspect, especially those who haven't owned a modern Benelli. I know there have been one or two fellows with bad luck, even in this forum, but it's always a very good idea to get to know your eccentric ride a bit better, and not to expect it to be or behave like a Suzook or whatever bulk bike. There have been one or two issues with these bikes, often related to the electrics. The bike has its own quirks, but when you get to know them and the bike a bit better, you will know what to avoid, and what to expect, and you will be enjoying the rides and the bike. There are some things you can do to improve it, like making sure the bike has the latest fuel maps installed, or better still, Tuneboy software well tweaked.

Another important thing is to find a good mechanic, unless you are a one yourself. An average car mechanic or even a jap bike mechanic may not know all there is to know about keeping these bikes in perfect nick, so finding a place where the people know these bikes does really matter.
I also know about cases where the riders of these bikes have been complaining about the rideability of the bikes, when the real problem has been some adjustments done incorrectly.

So all in all, these bikes, and especially the CR aren't everyone's cup of tea. They are rare, quirky, and oh so much fun. If you want to have a bike with lots of "character" and a high grin factor, go for one. In case you want an colourless, odorless and tasteless bike that 'everyone else' is riding, too, buy a Honda or whatever.
The CR is made with passion for passionate riding - which comes obvious when you get to know the bike, and even the details of the engine - it is a cafe racer, and certainly not a common commuter.
It's up to you, really, and what you really want from a bike.


As a rule of thumb, some general things to keep in mind with these bikes;

-do not pump the throttle, especially when the engine is warming up. Even when the engine is warm, just leave the silly pumping job for those tossers on their multicoloured I4 suzooks at traffic lights.

- do not fire up a cold engine, and then stop it, only to start it up again ten seconds later. Let it run idle for a while.

-always keep the battery in good nick, and don't replace it with a too weak one. These babes need all the power you can provide.

-always keep the chain in correct tension, and keep the idle rpm around 1,200 to 1,300 rpm.
The bike has a longish swingarm and a longish chain with rather small rear sprocket and a largish front sprocket, very much like a typical Italian twin bike, connected to a big three cylinder engine which needs a bit of revs to run smoothly.

Explaining all the little things in detail would make this way too long a post and quite a few of them have been discussed in other threads. So suffice to say, to avoid some common issues often labelled as weird Benelli faults, check the chain time to time, don't be a tosser - don't pump the throttle especially when the engine is cold, and don't let it idle with too low rpm. Some of the details like not touching the throttle when pressing the start button are being explained in the manual. It's a good idea to actually read the manual, even though the bike itself is very much like any other Italian bike.
 

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Nice write-up Quirky :clap:
 

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Yep, really good write up, thats whats needed, the positives aswell as the negatives makes for a good choice, well done that man.
 

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Ron, did you ride the CR after Russ remapped it? We all thought is was a bit snatchty, but I did not try it after the remap, it may have been a good idea to do so, but I buggered off on the Brutale.

Bloody gorgeous bike though and built quality of the main parts seems good, although some of the less important (but still expensive) parts seems lower, I'm thinking of the comedy seat hump thingy, which didn't seem all that well secured.

cheers
Fraser
 

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As long as we are talking about '06 models and onwards, and with the latest maps installed, there should not be any significant differences. Probably not much difference between CR and the older TnT models, either.

TnT Sport has 50mm Marzochhi forks, whereas Cafe Racer has 43mm ones, and without radial brake calipers. The engines and throttle bodies are the same in these two. Purely in theory, the CR might get a slightly better mpg, thanks to the more forward-leaning posture of the rider. But you should still be prepared to get less than impressive mpg numbers, because you won't be riding it like uncle Herbert's Ford, anyway.

There are some nice reviews about it here and there, and in the Kanooki OWD online magazine review N. Johnston called it a "gas station racer." Although I believe that a one with the latest fuel maps might be a bit less thirsty. At least in theory.

BTW, to my knowledge and with experience for a bike with a de-restricted Rotax 998cc twin, I don't think the Tuono, of all bikes, is actually any less thirsty, especially when ridden with certain enthusiasm. In that case, the move from Tuono to CR might not be much of a difference, as long as "gas station racing" is concerned.

As for which one is better, CR or Sport, I think there are already one or two other threads concerning the same dilemma. The answer in those being pretty much the same, it's hard to tell, and eventually the choice is a matter of taste. I have been riding both, and it's still hard to tell which one would be better. Once I said that perhaps the ideal TnT would be the Sport with the CR clipons. But having been riding the CR, the differences between these two aren't too big. The regular forks are quite okay as they are, and the regular brakes in the CR are pretty damn good, too, so if you prefer the clipons and the looks of the CR, just go for it. You won't be missing that much.
 

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Hi Seanh, I dont have any experience other than I had a test ride on one at the weekend and I was blown away with it, it just felt right, and it could boogie as well, cornered great what more can I say, I tested all the mv's and benellis and for me that was the best bike by far (my tornado was a close second) Dunno about the issues with it but if its anything like the tornadoes, find the right people to maintain it and enjoy it, I'm gonna try and get myself one next year for sure:D
 

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I had a run on the cafe racer on Saturday and the fueling was dead notchy.

I was there sunday aswell and 2 peeps told me they had no problems with it after russ mapped it.

I found the bike to be fast and nibble but not as hairy as the brutale's which are well named.

As long as you have back up in your area go for it. my wife and I are looking at the tnt899s once Moto Scozia get up and running.

P.s. hi all
 
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