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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
last weekend I was riding my 05 Tre when things started going wrong. I had been having trouble with geting the bike to start initally, then after traveling about 15 miles the bike just died. Again after several tries the bike started. Later on that morning the bike began to loose power and wouldn' rev. Finally I closed the throttle and the bike died. When I tried to start the bike again the motor was making strange noises and again would not rev. The trip home was made in the back of my van. Not so much fun. I haven't had time to look into the matter as yet, but was wondering if any one on the list had and suggestions.

Thanks
Phil
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Hi Phil,

Is it sounding very rough like it's running on only two cylinders? If so, you might have a problem with one of the stick coils. There have been a few guy's on the Forum that have had the same problem over the past few months, so this part seems to be quite suspect.

Start the engine and feel if each of the exhaust pipes are getting hot. If one is not, it might be worth getting the coil for that plug checked out.

Please keep us advised of your findings.

Laurence
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Is it sounding very rough like it's running on only two cylinders?
Not only that Laurence it sounds as though the idle needs to be picked up a bit (and maybe an air temp sensor relocated?).

My first piece of advise to you Capt Commando would be to not ride the bike, and secondly .... don't let the bike idle over for too long if you're going to be feeling those pipes:eek :eek
The last thing you want is leaving a couple of Layers of flesh on the pipes when you grab them. Oh, and don't try licking them as that could be even worse:lol


PS ...What is your bike ticking over at when you start her up?

Al;)
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I know it sound silly, but did you look in the tank and see if you had any petrol? some people have gauge level problems.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Had the same problem with mine - low tickover, stalling, running like @#%$. Shop just downloaded the latest ecu onto it, and it's been fine ever since.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Trouble in Paradixe

Having checked further into the problem we are now testing fuel pressure. Can anyone tell me how much PSI the fuel pump is supolst to put out?

Thanks,

Capt. Commando
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Re: Trouble in Paradixe

Fuel filter blocked?

This normally wouldn't explain the difficulty starting - on a carburated engine - but it does hold it back from developing full power.

Just a thought.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Trouble in Paradise

Well guys, it only gets worse. The mechanic working on my Tre informed me today that the bike won't run because it has no compression. 50psi on the outer cylinders and 60psi on the middle one. The bike only has 500 miles on it and it has never seen red line. However we are going to do a leak down test to try and see where the compression is going.

Looks like a lunched motor at this time. Remember I'm on the other side of the world from the nearest dealer. Texas, USA
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Re: Trouble in Paradise

Wouldn't have guessed that one. Head gasket blown between between all 3 cylinders? Perhaps the factory didn't re-torque the head properly.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
most likely

as a lunched motor would sound like hell!
time for the factory to resolve the cam chain guide as well.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Trouble In Paradise

Well, the verdect is in. We tested for fuel pressure, spark, etc. and the finally compression. "There was none." The readings were: 50/60/50psi. Then we removed the valve cover the find the front cam chain tensioner had failed, allowing the timing chain to slip resulting in loss of valve timing. The good news is that we don't think the valves tangled or hit the pistons. Ther is a lot of rubber debree, from the tensioner, in the top in and throughout the motor, but nothing resembling metal. I hope to be able to repair the motor with just a replacement tensioner and cam chain. The motor will have to be totally flushed as well. I'll keep everyone posted on how the repairs go and whether or not Benelli will warranty all the parts we will need.
Capt. Commando
Dalls, TX
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Re: Trouble In Paradise

Hello,

How many Km's has your bike done, also what year and model?

I had some trouble with a failed front guide which required a complete rebuild.

Check Engenia's posts as he is studying this problem in more detail.

Good luck
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Re: Trouble In Paradise

Capt.
I reckon that the spring in the cam chain tensioner is too short. It can't push the plunger to it's full extension. When it stops working, the chain will continue to wear, lengthen, and start to slap around. This will trash the front guide, as it is softer that the rear (moving) guide. It's not the guide that causes the problem, but the tensioner.

The chain, as it continues to wear, will eventually be slack enough to jump teeth on the sprockets. If only 1, only the timing is off. If more, valves are bent.


How many km's hjas it done?
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Re: Trouble In Paradise

Capt.
I've had a look at Tax's dead engine, and measured up the cam chain tensioner.

I reckon that the spring in the cam chain tensioner is too short. It can't push the plunger to it's full extension - perhaps only 75%. When it stops working, the chain will continue to wear, lengthen, and start to slap around. This will trash the front guide, as it is softer that the rear (moving) guide. It's not the guide that causes the problem, but the tensioner.

The chain, as it continues to wear, will eventually be slack enough to jump teeth on the sprockets. If only 1, only the timing is off. If more, valves are bent.

The more you rev it, the more chance you have of skipping multiple teeth. The chain will rise higher on the teeth because of the higher centrifugal force.

I'm documenting the result on my website, but was going to run them by JohnnyO first, to see what he thought, before making it public. Not sure if he is even available anymore.

(John, if you read this, send me an email, and I'll let you know what I've found)

Mine is due for a replacement cam chain in 1000 kms, and the adjustment left in the spring is 1.3 mm, so mine will be fine. However, I'm no boy racer. I rarely take her above 9 grand, and have never had her on the track. In short, mine has had an easy life.

If yours (& I'm referring to everyone here) has had a harder life, it would be worthwhile checking the spring length. Let me know if you want to do this, and I'll tell you how, once I get a second opinion. (It's easy - only takes 10 minutes)
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Re: Trouble In Paradise

Engenia,

your quote: (It's easy - only takes 10 minutes)

Does not include time taken to take off and replace side panel :rollin
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Re: Trouble In Paradise

OK Tax, add 4 minutes to remove & replace the panel.

15 minutes tops - including a tea break.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Re: What 15

It'd be quicker to ride over to see me in Canberra!

Seriously though, I've just talked to Anders at Eurotune, and he is of the opinion that you shouldn't expect the tensioner to move very far. When he changed Baz's chain a while back, the tensioner moved quite some distance to reset itself. So maybe only 5mm of movement in its lifetime is expected.

I'll know more when I change mine in a month or so. I'll then know what to expect from a new chain.

In any case, it's so easy to do, that it could be done every oil change, just for peace of mind.
 
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